Webmatters Title
Webmatters : Ypres Town Cemetery, Ieper

Ypres Town Cemetery

Location

Ypres Town Cemetery is located a kilometre east of Ieper town centre, on the Zonnebeekseweg, connecting Ieper to Menen on the N345. From Ieper town centre the Zonnebeekseweg is located via Torhoutstraat and right onto Basculestraat. Basculestraat ends at a main crossroads, and the Zonnebeekseweg is the first left turning. The cemetery itself is located 300 metres along the Zonnebeekseweg on the right hand side of the road.

In other words it is about three hundred metres on the far side of the Menin Gate Memorial. The cemetery is surrounded by a high red brick wall and the entrance to the CWGC cemeteries is at the far end. Parking is limited on the side of the road so find a space alongside the cemetery wall before you reach the houses.

GPS N E Wikimapia
Decimal 50.853918 2.897612 Map

Ypres Town Cemetery

The Town Cemetery

 

Historical Information

From October 1914 to the summer of 1918, Ypres (now Ieper) formed the centre of a salient held by Commonwealth (and for a while French) forces. From April 1915, the town was bombarded and destroyed more completely than any other town of its size on the western front.

By the outbreak of the Second World War, Ieper had been completely rebuilt, but saw heavy fighting before it fell to the Germans on 29th May 1940.

Ypres Town Cemetery

Close to the Menin Gate, was used from October 1914 to May 1915, and once in 1918. The cemetery contains 145 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, grouped in plots among the civil graves.

You enter these cemeteries via the Extension. Half way up on your right is a gap leading through to the plots within the Town Cemetery. Prince Maurice is immediately behind this entrance.

The Extension

On the east side of the town cemetery, was also begun in October 1914 and was used until April 1915, and on two further occasions in 1918. The Extension was much increased after the Armistice when 367 graves were brought in from small cemeteries and isolated positions east and north of Ypres.

Ypres Town Cemetery Extension

The Extension

There are now 598 Commonwealth casualties of the First World War buried or commemorated in the extension. 137 of the burials are unidentified and there are special memorials to 16 servicemen known or believed to be buried among them. Second World War burials number 43, of which 13 are unidentified.

During and after the fighting of May 1940, three civilian hospitals in the town, (Hopital de Notre Dame, the Clinique des Soeurs Noires and the Red Cross Hospital in St. Aloisius School, D’Hondstraat), cared for the wounded, and those who died were buried in the Town Cemetery Extension. Others buried on the battlefield were later brought in by the Ypres town services.

There are now 598 Commonwealth casualties of the First World War buried or commemorated in the extension. 137 of the burials are unidentified and there are special memorials to 16 servicemen known or believed to be buried among them. Second World War burials number 43, of which 13 are unidentified.

The extension was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

Ypres Town Cemetery Extension

The Extension

 


Prince Maurice of Battenberg KCVO

Lieutenant HH
Prince Maurice of Battenberg KCVO
1st Bn King’s Royal Rifle Corps
Died on 27th October 1914 aged 23
The youngest son of Prince Henry and
Princess Beatrice of Battenberg
Grandson of Victoria,
Queen of Great Britain and Ireland
Empress of India

Grave: I B

The highest ranked member of British nobility to die during the war.


2nd Lieutenant Logan Studley

2nd Lieutenant Logan Studley
1st Bn East Yorkshire Regiment
Died on 25th October 1914 aged 17
Son of Mary and the late Major Harry Studley
of 8, Dempster Terrace, St. Andrews, Fife

Grave: A1 7

 

Other cemeteries in the area


Recent Additions

Canadian Cemetery No.2

Givenchy Road Canadian Cemetery

Petit Vimy British Cemetery

CWGC Poppy Button